Posted by: Ray | August 13, 2008

Amble, the Saga of replacing the masthead wind instrument and VHF aerial continues.

The riggers came today to install the new wind instrument and VHF aerial at the top of the mast but were unable to feed a draw cable down the mast by gravity.

Usually existing cables can be used, but these had been cut whilst raising the sail, or to free the tangle of cables from the sail track. So Christine Marie has to have her mast lifted from the yacht tomorrow morning and taken ashore to complete the work.

Christine Marie prepared for mast to come off.

Christine Marie prepared for mast to come off, boom and cables disconnected.

 

I have been busy this afternoon disconnecting cables and removing the boom/sail from the mast to help speed up the work and to minimize costs. The only plus is that I will get to see the process and view the rigging and cable runs inside the mast and try and ensure the problem does not reoccur in the future.  An expensive lesson! … 

I am reliably informed by my friend Brian (Ships mate) that the expression for owning a yacht is “like taking cold showers whilst tearing up £50 notes!!!!  😦

The cause of the problem

The cause of the problem

 

The photo was taken with a tele-photo camera and shows the wind instrument cable flowing as a loop from the sail track. At the top of that loop, just above the radar reflector,  you can just see where it has pulled out the VHF aerial cable with it!

  

Mast being lifted ashore

Mast being lifted ashore

 

 

 

 The boatyard at Amble is just outside the Marina bar and has 1m less water than in the Marina. This meant I only had about 2 hours with sufficient water for the mast to be ‘de-stepped’ (disconnected and taken down) and taken ashore ….. 

 

    

Returning to marina without mast.

Returning to marina without mast.

 

 

 

…… then I had to return Christine Marie to the Marina and come back at high water the following day when the work was completed, to reinstall the mast. It was very interesting and the photos show the sequence.

 

 

mastashore

Mast ashore

 

 

 

Once the mast was ashore it was very easy to see how the problem had occured.

 

 

 

  

Groove in mast with 'draw cable' ready to pull new cables through

Groove in mast with 'draw cable' ready to pull new cables through

 

 

The photo shows the sail groove (left of photo) with the small cable channel running down the mast close by (there is a gap between the two, that a cable can pass between unless it is thick enough not to)  ….  the ‘draw’ wire (right of photo) is shown in the cable channel that would pull the new cables through. 

Aerial and wind instrument cables taped together

Aerial and wind instrument cables taped together

 

I helped the yard tape the new aerial and wind instrument cables together, using tape wound in spirrals down the length to avoid loops forming that might pass through; the thickness of the two should not pass through the connecting gap and we tensioned the cables with cable ties at top and bottom of the mast. (this might have prevented the problem if done before).  

New wind instrument and aerial installed.

New wind instrument and aerial installed.

 

Work completed, Christine Marie is now back in the Marina, with her mast  🙂 and I have re-connected all the instruments and checked them working ok. Crew join me on  Wednesday (20 Aug) and weather permitting we set sail for Eyemouth in Scotland, anchoring on route over night in the National Trust Farne and Holy Islands.  

Warkworth Castle near Amble.

Warkworth Castle near Amble.

 

 

I am raring to set sail again, but have enjoyed my stay at Amble where I have had a warm welcome and made some good friends. I have crew now until the 6 Sept so I am still  holding to my plan to reach Peterhead, then sail on to the Orkneys and back down the W coast to over-winter at Oban.  Next update from Eyemouth or Arbroath in Scotland. 🙂

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Miles completed:   619      Total Hours:  145       

Engine hours:   43        Avespeed: 4.3Kn      

M ax speed: 12.4Kn (helped by tide, wind and waves!!)

Ports visited:    20                     Nights at anchor/mooring bouy 4

            Rethink                   Marie Curie                      RNLI

http://www.justgiving.com/roundukcruise-rethink       http://www.justgiving.com/roundukcruisemariecurie         
 
 
Please support me and visit my charity donation sites by clicking on the link of your choice above. If you are unhappy about using your credit card on-line, donations can be made at any Halifax or Bank of Scotland Branch by the usual methods.
Donations made this way will be split equally between the three charities.  Please make cheques or payments to:  
 
R Oliver (Round UK Cruise)      sort code 11-05-47,  A/c No 00725187
 

A link with further information is on the left of this page.  Thank you  Ray

 

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